first_imgNxtbook Media already has a handful of publishers using its Liberty mobile product, which has been available for a little over a year, but there’s not much opportunity right now, admits Marcus Grimm, marketing director. “Usage is low,” he says. “It’s more about planting your flag in the ground and letting your readers know that you care about the mobile space.”While no one can predict whether people will prefer or even choose to read magazines on mobile devices in the next few years, readers are already being fractured into many different categories. Grimm believes “100 percent” in figuring out how to take the PDF supplied by publishers and crack it affordably into as many different formats as possible. “In today’s world,” he says, “there are so many different ways to render your content. You really have to step back, look at the content, and consider where a particular piece will be best received. Longer-format content plays well in a digital magazine, for example, while shorter formats play well on a Web site.”Until that answer is clear, suppliers and publishers alike must make sure they don’t fall back too many steps. Popular Science is working on mobile initiatives to get its content onto the iPhone and other devices but is holding back on making its entire magazine or its just-announced PopSci Genius Guide quarterly supplements available on the mobile platform. “We want the publication to be seen at regular size,” says editor-in-chief Mark Jannot. “But we don’t want to wait until the right mobile device is available and then have to put something together. We’re in the midst of a transition period.”BACK TO MAIN PAGE Mobile is clearly where digital publishing is heading, according to Zinio’s Rich Maggiotto. Experimentation will continue, though, because no one has yet figured out the right business model for making money in mobile. “I do know one thing for certain,” he says. “Giving it away for free is not a business model.”The market saturation of mobile devices is huge, with more than three billion units currently in use worldwide. Given the capabilities of those devices, including e-readers, that are on the market today, suppliers and publishers alike recognize that they’re not yet a good fit even for flat print magazine replicas let alone for the rich layout of multimedia digital versions. Magazines publishers use a two-page spread layout to communicate information visually. If you can’t view that layout on the mobile device due to the screen size (and, in the case of Amazon’s Kindle, it lacks color), the reading experience is not particularly satisfying.But a surge in mobile delivery of magazines is clearly going to happen. Maggiotto expects some “pretty phenomenal things” to happen over the next 24 months. A lot of companies will be following up with new and different display technologies to compete for market share. And what publisher won’t want to tap into such an enormous, involved audience?last_img read more

first_imgPool revenue using the Selfsh-Mine strategy for different propagation factors, compared to the honest Bitcoin protocol. Simulation matches the theoretical analysis, and both show that Selfsh-Mine results in higher revenues than the honest protocol above a threshold. Credit: arXiv:1311.0243 [cs.CR] . Explore further (Phys.org) —Bitcoin is a digital currency that has, well, gained currency, as a medium of exchange. Now two computer science researchers from Cornell find that this extensive ecosystem can be undermined and they outline how in a paper that they have posted on arXiv. More information: Majority is not Enough: Bitcoin Mining is Vulnerable, arXiv:1311.0243 [cs.CR]: arxiv.org/abs/1311.0243hackingdistributed.com/2013/11 … /faq-selfish-mining/www.newscientist.com/article/d … irtual-currency.html New fund launched for bitcoin investors The paper, “Majority is not Enough: Bitcoin Mining is Vulnerable,” is by Ittay Eyal, a postdoc member of the Computer Sciences department at Cornell and Emin Gun Sirer, associate professor at Cornell. According to the two researchers, “Empirical evidence shows that Bitcoin miners behave strategically and form pools. Specifically, because rewards are distributed at infrequent, random intervals miners form mining pools in order to decrease the variance of their income rate. Within such pools, all members contribute to the solution of each cryptopuzzle, and share the rewards proportionally to their contributions. To the best of our knowledge, so far such pools have been benign and followed the protocol.” Nonetheless, they describe a strategy that could be used by a minority pool to obtain more revenue than the pool’s fair share, that is, more than its ratio of the total mining power. “The key idea behind this strategy, called Selfish Mining, is for a pool to keep its discovered blocks private, thereby intentionally forking the chain,” they wrote. This selfishness can come out of people getting together to siphon off more money than a fair share for mining activities.The authors wrote that central to Bitcoin operations is a public log called the blockchain where all transactions are recorded. The security of the blockchain is established by a chain of cryptographic puzzles solved by a loosely organized network of participants called miners. The two researchers present an attack with which colluding miners obtain a revenue larger than their fair share. “This attack can have significant consequences for Bitcoin,” they warned, where rational miners join selfish miners and the colluding group increases increase in size until it becomes a majority. At this point, they said, the Bitcoin system ceases to be a decentralized currency. A Scientific American report on their findings further explained how damage might occur: Instead of releasing solutions to solved cryptopuzzles. The selfish crew can mine a branch in secret, hiding it from honest miners. The group would then get a higher share of coins than is fair for the resources they have contributed because they have forced other miners to waste computing power on the original chain. The problem gets worse as the selfish group recruits extra members.Elsewhere, the two were asked if they were trying to take Bitcoin down with their sober warning. “We’re Bitcoin supporters,” they blogged, ” and are working to make the currency stronger against a broader set of possible misbehaviors than what has been considered so far.” They proposed in their paper a practical modification to the Bitcoin protocol that protects against selfish mining pools. Can Bitcoin remain a viable currency? Sirer said, “Probably. We have shown that as long as selfish miners are below a certain threshold, they will not succeed.” Citation: Cornell researchers teach Bitcoin attack lesson in selfish mining (2013, November 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-11-cornell-bitcoin-lesson-selfish.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2013 Phys.orglast_img read more

first_imgA missile fired by Syrian forces killed at least 18 civilians on Tuesday in a residential neighbourhood of the old quarter of Aleppo city, a monitoring group said. “The missile struck when people were still inside their homes in the Maghayir district. It killed 18 civilians, including one child, and wounded dozens of others,” said Rami Abdel Rahman, director of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.“There are many people still stuck in the rubble, and ambulances are going back and forth transporting people,” Abdel Rahman said.The Britain-based Observatory said the death toll was likely to rise as more bodies were discovered.Photos published by the monitor showed crumbling walls surrounded by a sea of dusty plastic and cinderblocks.Groups of men, some wearing the white helmets associated with civil defence volunteers, waded through the rubble. More than 35 homes were destroyed, the Observatory said.last_img read more

first_img This story originally appeared on Engadget December 28, 2017 2 min read Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals The iPhone X’s Face ID sensors have shown great potential for art, gaming and just weird apps, but a Japanese developer has taken another tack with the device. Using Unity, ViRD game developer @noshipu, aka Kazuya Noshiro, completely erased his face, except for his mouth and eyes, as shown in the 10-second clip below. Calling the trick “optical camouflage,” Noshiro admitted that he has no clue what it can be used for. “If you want to make your face transparent, we’re recruiting,” he joked.iPhoneX?????????????????? pic.twitter.com/aPXJcHi8Y4— ??? (@noshipu) December 27, 2017Noshiro didn’t say exactly how the trick worked, despite curiosity from his followers. However, one person asked him if he fixed the camera to pre-record the background, and he admitted “that’s correct.” So in other words, he likely first recorded what was behind him, then masked out his face — bar his eyes and mouth — and inserted the background. The iPhone X’s motion sensors could synchronize everything with the camera movement.The effect shows the potential of sensor-laden phones like the iPhone X — which are bound to become more common with Face ID-like security — and how ARkit can work with other developer platforms like Unity. Sure, it seems perfectly useless, which is why it might also make a pretty sweet Snapchat filter. Register Now »last_img read more

first_img PUERTO VALLARTA — Mexico’s Velas Resorts has expanded its incentive bonus program for travel agents, giving them more opportunities to earn rewards and different levels of certification.The Velas Resorts Experts program allows agents to become experts on Velas Resorts properties by completing video lessons and quizzes about each resort. As each quiz is passed, the agent becomes more qualified and moves up in the different levels of certification: Velas Expert, Master Agent, and Elite Agent.Agents are rewarded with generous bonuses and access to special amenities, complimentary nights, suite upgrades and VIP amenities for their clients, as well as a 50% extra bonus for all reservations and qualified bookings made during the first month of their Velas Expert registration. This bonus is in addition to any commissions made.A referral program is also valid where, in addition to the above benefits, agents are also awarded for referring teammates to the Velas Experts program. Payment of bonuses take place within 30 days after the customers have left the hotel.More news:  AMResorts has a new Sr. Dir. of Cdn. Sales & Consortia Rel’nsTo achieve ‘Velas Expert’, agents must book 1-29 room nights and become a certified expert in at least one hotel to earn 1,000 welcome points, an anniversary gift, day pass and other perks.A Master agent must reserve 50 room nights and be certified in all five Velas Resorts. This will earn 2,000 additional points, bonus payouts with prepaid Visa card, access to specialized segment certifications (weddings, groups and conventions), and a checkbook with special amenities for clients.Finally, Elite Agents must book at least 75 room nights, as well as maintain their expert certification in all five Velas Resorts to earn 3,500 additional points, plus the most exclusive guest amenities for clients. The multiple benefits are accumulative and increase as agents progress through the curriculum. Points can be used towards stays at any of the resorts or at an online store with spa & beauty salon services, insuite amenities and more.Agents can easily register at velasexperts.com and complete the video lessons and quizzes to obtain an expert certification for each property. Velas Resorts comprises four luxury all-inclusive properties in Vallarta-Nayarit and Riviera Maya, with a fifth opening on Dec. 20 in Los Cabos.More news:  Le Boat has EBBs along with its new 2020 brochureGo to velasresorts.com for more details. << Previous PostNext Post >> Tags: Mexico, Velas Resorts Posted by Sharecenter_img Travelweek Group Friday, November 18, 2016 Become an expert & earn rewards with Velas’ expanded agent programlast_img read more