Ever try to get inside the mind of a teenager?Dr. Ron Clavier has, and he will discuss teen behaviour during the Centre for Lifespan Development Research‘s Speaker Series Monday, Nov. 17.Entitled Teen Brain, Teen Mind: A Neuro-Developmental Approach to Living and Working With Adolescents, Dr. Clavier argues that a clear understanding of the developing brain is the key to unlocking the age-old mysteries of why teens and pre-teens act the way they act and think the way they think.Since 1982, Dr. Clavier has run a private practice in clinical psychology, basing it on his background as a neuroscientist.His presentation will address topics of relevance to professionals in the health and education communities who work with teens and pre-teens.Dr. Clavier will offer numerous coping tips and strategies designed to ease tensions and improve communications.This is event is free and open to the public, but RSVP is required as space is limited.For more information or to RSVP for the event, please contact Jayne Morrish or Allison Flynn-Bowman at lifespan@brocku.ca or call 905-688-5550 x4566*****Topic: Teen Brain, Teen Mind: A Neuro-Developmental Approach to Living and Working With Adolescents – Presented by Dr. Ron ClavierWhen: Monday, Nov. 17 from 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m.Where: Brock University – Plaza Building, room 600F-500 read more

Canola seed exporters report Chinese companies — one of their major markets — have stopped buying their product, according to an industry group.The ongoing trade dispute that started earlier this month when China revoked the permit of a major Canadian exporter is also causing woes for canola farmers, grappling with lower prices and delayed shipments.Canola seed exporters have told the Canola Council of Canada that Chinese importers are currently unwilling to purchase their product, the group said in a statement released Thursday. Companies that are members of the council include Viterra Inc., Louis Dreyfus Company, Cargill Ltd. and Parrish & Heimbecker Ltd.The reports come weeks after China’s foreign ministry blocked imports from one of Canada’s largest grain producers, Richardson International Ltd., citing fears of insect infestation. Saskatchewan canola farmers push Ottawa to sort out China trade dispute that’s blocking some exports China’s canola embargo once again turns Canadian farmers into political footballs For Chrystia Freeland, the battle over canola with China is personal Blocked by China, Canada’s biggest canola exporter says it has become target in Ottawa-Beijing spat At the time, some suggested the move was retaliation for Canada’s arrest of a top Chinese tech executive. In December, Canadian authorities arrested Huawei Technologies Co. Inc. senior executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver at the behest of the United States.There was some initial optimism that Chinese concerns with canola trade could be resolved quickly, the industry group said, and it’s disappointed that did not happen.Canada exports about 40 per cent of its canola seed, oil and meal to China with canola seed exports to the country being worth $2.7 billion in 2018, according to the council.“Under the circumstances, Canadian canola seed exporters who normally ship to China have no alternative but to supply customers in other countries who value high quality Canadian canola,” said Jim Everson, the council’s president, in a statement.It has also created problems for farmers.David Reid, 42, is a partner at the family farm he grew up on in Cremona, Alta. — about 90 kilometres northwest of Calgary. Canola accounts for about 30 per cent of what the farm produces now.The farm sells to a company that exports the product to other places, like China, but after Richardson’s permit was revoked Reid said shipments slowed and he saw an immediate price drop for his product.Prices fell by a dollar a bushel, he said, which he estimated to be a 12 per cent fall.The price of the commodity also fell in futures contract trading since Wanzhou’s arrest. The May canola futures contract was trading at $458.30 per tonne Friday afternoon — down nearly 2.2 per cent.Reid is now holding on to more of his product in hopes the price will rise.“We don’t know how long we might have to wait for the price to increase,” he said, adding that while it’s possible to store the product for a long time, bin space will become an issue by the fall when he’ll need the space for the next canola crop.He has already sold some product at the lower price, which hurts his bottom line.“Everybody’s feeling it for sure,” he said of other canola farmers he knows. read more

Outlaw biker gangs and their merchandise are no longer welcome at Friday the 13th motorcycle rallies in Port Dover.Norfolk council approved a ban on vendor’s permits for motorcycle clubs with a criminal history Tuesday night.This means Hells Angels are no longer able to sell hats, T-shirts and other items in Port Dover promoting “the Big Red Machine.”Council acted after an extensive in-camera consultation with senior OPP officials.Police shared a long list of concerns Tuesday about the evolution of Friday the 13th and its implications for public safety.A presentation to council ended with Insp. Joe Varga, head of the Norfolk OPP, asking council to consider moving the rally to private property with a private security detail.The primary concern is gang rivalries flaring up in the crowded core of Port Dover.An OPP tactical unit was stationed beside the Hells Angels display on Main Street during the well-attended rally last July.Police confirmed this week they had received reports of a possible incident occurring in Port Dover involving the Hells Angels and a rival gang. Nothing happened but police aren’t sure how long they can keep the peace.“Tensions are rising between motorcycle gangs,” Varga said after council voted. “These tensions are spilling over to the Friday the 13th event.”Varga shared a number of other concerns with council.In the name of tourism, Varga said the county has promoted Friday the 13th “to the point that the event has become dangerous in regards to public safety.”Friday the 13th had humble beginnings in 1981 as a one-night party at the former Commercial Hotel. Varga said it has since sprawled into a three- or four-day event requiring hundreds of police officers.He noted that the front-line complement at the Norfolk detachment totals 96 officers.Meanwhile – at last July’s event – a total of 450 officers were required from across Ontario. Nearly 200,000 people were in Port Dover July 13 along with more than 15,000 motorcycles.“The actions of Norfolk County over the years have sanctioned the growth of the event and have attracted known criminal organizations such as the Hells Angels,” Varga said.“By promoting the event and attracting these criminal organizations, Norfolk County has increased the risk to an unacceptable level to both attendees and county residents, as evidenced by documented events which took place at the July 13 event.“Norfolk County sells vendor permits for street booths to allow vendors to sell goods and earns income from these sales. The fact some of these vendors are known criminal organizations – Hells Angels – means Norfolk County is essentially supporting these criminal organizations and enabling them to fund criminal activity.”Delhi Coun. Mike Columbus, chair of Tuesday’s meeting, is also a member of Norfolk’s Police Services Board. He told council the OPP’s concerns are not new. Columbus said the PSB has frequently discussed the criminal element in association with Friday the 13th.“They are very concerned about public safety and liability to Norfolk County and its taxpayers,” Columbus said.Varga also told council that the presence of motorcycles on congested streets is a disaster waiting to happen. He said police, fire officials and paramedics agree the lack of access and egress due to the huge crowds is a serious threat to public safety.“Norfolk County is putting these police officers, general public and the motoring public at physical risk by continuing to promote an event that is essentially causing traffic chaos,” Varga said.“At a very minimum, the OPP would like to see the event moved onto a private-property venue and utilize licensed private security for some duties and paid-duty officers for required policing duties.”Council acknowledges the OPP’s concerns. But Mayor Kristal Chopp wonders how exactly the county would prevent motorcycle riders from showing up in downtown Port Dover on Friday the 13th.“As to Mr. Varga’s suggestion, it has merit but I don’t believe there is any way to stop enthusiasts from coming to Port Dover at this point,” Chopp said Wednesday in an email. “It’s a non-starter for this year. They are coming whether we like it or not and we need to be ready.“That said, we will certainly take the suggestion under advisement and the PSB and council will meet to discuss public safety and other issues for future events.”The next rally in September has the potential to be as large as the rally last July. If the weather is good, demand for a run to Port Dover will be high due to the 14-month interval between events.MSonnenberg@postmedia.com read more