first_imgA teenager was shot dead allegedly by a retired head constable of CRPF after a heated argument in Dausa district of Rajasthan. The incident occurred on Sunday when a verbal spat broke out between Ravi Kumar Meena (18) and Laxminarayan Meena (68) over some issue. Laxminarayan took out his licensed gun and shot at Ravi, SHO Baswa police station Veer Singh said. The teen died on the way to the hospital. The retired constable was detained on Monday, the SHO said Ravi’s body was handed over to his family after a postmortem.last_img read more

first_imgThe special CBI court in Ranchi on Thursday deferred pronouncing the quantum of sentence against Rashtriya Janata Dal chief Lalu Prasad and 15 other accused in a fodder scam case for the second consecutive day and indicated that it could be done through video conference on Friday.Mr. Prasad said he has no problem appearing in court.In a crowded court-room the CBI court judge Shiv Pal Singh said he would deliver the sentence in alphabetical order and asked the RJD chief to leave the court as his number would come up on Friday. The judge also said that he would decide on Friday whether the sentence would be given over video conference or in court. Responding to him, Mr. Prasad said he was for personal appearance and gave an assurance there would be no slogans raised in the courtroom by his supporters.Agency reports said the CBI judge also said that he had received phone calls from the RJD chief’s well-wishers but he should not worry as he would only follow the law. The judge, however, did not elaborate from whom he had received the calls, said the reports.‘I am innocent’However, lawyers who were present in the courtroom told the media Mr. Prasad told the judge that he was innocent and should be acquitted. Mr. Prasad and the judge also exchanged a few sentences in a lighter vein, they said.Later, amid tight security Mr. Prasad returned to the Birsa Munda Central jail of Ranchi where he, along with the other convicts in the case, is lodged.The case, RC 64(A)/96, pertains to the fraudulent withdrawal of ₹84.5 crore from Deoghar (now in Jharkhand) treasury between 1991-1994.Like the last two days, a large number of RJD leaders and workers were present outside the jail gate and on the court premises.“We’ll stay here even on Friday…he (Lalu Prasad) is our leader…how can we leave him here all alone,” said RJD leader and party legislator Vijay Prakash.Senior party leader Raghuvansh Prasad too was present on the court premises giving bites to local news channels. However, no family member of Mr. Lalu Prasad was around. Party sources said they were busy offering prayers at temples in Patna.On Wednesday the court issued contempt notices to senior RJD leaders Raghuvansh Prasad, Shivanand Tiwari, leader of opposition Tejaswi Yadav and Congress spokesperson Manish Tiwari for criticising the court verdict in the media on December 23. The RJD leaders said they would respond to the notice when they receive it.‘One to seven years’Meanwhile, legal luminaries told The Hindu that for the sections under which Mr. Prasad has been convicted, the quantum of imprisonment could be a minimum of one year to maximum seven years.“But, it all depends on the evidence collected by the court and how the judge observes and interprets it,” said Patna-based lawyer Y.V. Giri.In Patna, the RJD leaders have been saying, “Come what may, the party is ready for the next battle to chase away fascist forces from the country and the State as well.”last_img read more

first_imgNineteen people, including three children, were killed and six others were injured after a cement-laden truck they were travelling in overturned on a highway in Gujarat’s Bhavnagar. The victims were labourers from central Gujarat and were coming from Pipavav port.“Twenty-five people were in the open cement laden truck. The driver lost control while overtaking another vehicle on the highway and the truck turned turtle. Twelve women were among those killed,” a State government release said. The government has announced compensation of ₹4 lakh each for the victims.“My thoughts are with the families of those who lost their lives in the accident… I pray that those who have been injured in the accident recover at the earliest,” Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted.Gujarat Chief Minister Vijay Rupani asked the authorities to conduct an inquiry. The truck driver fled after the accident.last_img read more

first_imgGoa Congress president Girish Chodankar on Friday slammed the BJP-led coalition government for failing to protect Sidharth Kuncalienkar, the BJP’s candidate for Panaji bypoll. It also demanded that at least 100 police personnel should throw a permanent security cordon around Mr. Kuncalienkar.Mr. Chodankar was responding to a complaint by Mr. Kuncalienkar who on Thursday accused the Opposition of acting out of frustration, after two unknown persons on Thursday night flung a bottle at Mr. Kuncalienkar’s car while he was returning home.Mr. Chodankar also questioned the law and order situation in the city saying that the BJP-led coalition government had failed to provide security for its own candidate. “The Congress is not in power. If your candidate is not safe, then how can you safeguard people?,” asked Mr. Chodankar at a press conference here.“First of all, it is a shame for the government and the Chief Minister. Government is run by the Chief Minister and Home Ministry is also under him,” Mr. Chodankar said, emphasising that the police needs to arrest the culprit as soon as possible. A police complaint was registered at the Panaji town police station on Friday after the incident. Mr. Kuncalienkar was travelling along with a friend on Thursday night in Panaji’s Mala ward when unknown persons riding a two-wheeler flung a bottle at his car’s wind shield. Mr. Kuncalienkar said further in his complaint that the incident happened while passing through his constituency, after a public meeting addressed by Union Minister for Road Transport and Highways Nitin Gadkari was over on Thursday evening.“My opponents must have been rattled after the success of the meeting, which is why they resorted to this act in desperation,” Mr. Kuncalienkar said while speaking to the media persons. Mr. Kuncalienkar is facing Atanasio Monserrate of the Congress, Valmiki Naik of the Aam Aadmi Party and Subhash Velingkar of the Goa Suraksha Manch, among others in the May 19 bypoll for Panaji, which is taking place following the demise of Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar on March 17.last_img read more

first_imgThe four Lok Sabha seats of Himachal Pradesh witnessed a turnout of around 71% on Sunday, officials said. The voters turnout crossed the 2014 general election’s polling percentage of 64.45 in the State. Interestingly, 132% turnout has been recorded in the world’s highest polling station in Tashigang village of Himachal Pradesh’s tribal Lahaul and Spiti district, a district official said. There are total 49 registered voters in the Tashigang polling station. Of these, 33 voters cast their votes till 3 pm. Apart from the registered voters, 32 members of the poll staff deployed at the Tashigang polling station and several nearby booths cast their vote here after showing election duty certificate (EDCs) issued to them by concerned AROs, he added. The Tashigang polling station is situated at a height of 15,256 feet above the sea level, State’s Assistant Chief Electoral Officer Harbans Lal Dhiman said. The temperature was below freezing point at Tashigang when the polling began at 7 a.m. The voters came to the polling station while wearing their traditional attire for exercising their right to franchise. Vote before marriageA bridegroom exercised his right to franchise in Kothi polling station in Manali of Himachal Pradesh’s Kullu district. Before proceeding to his bride’s village for his marriage, Anil, 28, of Kothi village near Manali, led his entire wedding procession to the polling booth number eight in the city and cast his vote, besides making his wedding companions to do the same. “Anil cast his vote before proceeding for his marriage,” a district election official said, adding the groom reached the polling with many of his wedding procession members. The first Indian voter, Shyam Saran Negi, 101, cast his vote at Kinnaur district’s Kalpa polling booth under Mandi Lok Sabha seat. He was given warm welcome by the election staff at the booth. However the voters of a village on the Sino-India border have boycotted the Lok Sabha poll as the government “failed” to find a permanent solution to frequent floods they face. Located at an altitude of 10,000 feet and around 350 km from state capital Shimla, voters at Geu village in Lahaul and Spiti district said they had been demanding their resettlement, but their demands remained unheard. Chief Minister Jai Ram Thakur along with his family members cast his vote at Bharari (Murhag) in Seraj Vidhan Sabha constituency of Mandi district. EVM snags delayed voting at nine polling stations, but it restarted after the faulty machines were replaced, a State election officer said. A total of 7,730 polling stations had been set up in 4 constituencies — Shimla (SC), Mandi, Hamirpur and Kangra.last_img read more

first_imgThe U.S. Senate last night confirmed France Córdova to be director of the National Science Foundation (NSF). An astrophysicist and former university president, the 66-year-old Córdova succeeds Subra Suresh, who stepped down 1 year ago to become president of Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Cordova was nominated last summer by President Barack Obama for a 6-year term. In the interim, Cora Marrett has served as acting director of the $7 billion agency. Marrett will now return to her Senate-confirmed position as deputy NSF director.You can read ScienceInsider’s coverage of Córdova’s nomination here. We also wrote about the Senate’s slow confirmation process and conducted an interview with Córdova on her decision to accept the nomination.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

first_imgA double whammy of weird ocean behavior washed over the world in 1997. The Pacific Ocean had already succumbed to an exceptionally strong El Niño, and then the Indian Ocean was hit fiercely by El Niño’s close cousin: the so-called Indian Ocean Dipole. Surface waters off the coast of Indonesia cooled and the ocean’s predominant westerly winds reversed, leading to catastrophic weather. Fires raged across a drought-stricken Indonesia, and floods across east African nations killed thousands.Climate change could make years like 1997 come more often, according to a new study of the Indian Ocean Dipole cycle, which alternates between two opposite extremes, positive and negative, just as El Niño does with La Niña. The study suggests that rising greenhouse gases will cause extreme positive dipole events—like the one that struck the Indian Ocean in 1997—to occur three times as often this century as they did in the 20th century, or about once every 6 years, as opposed to once every 17 years.“The Indian Ocean Dipole affects a lot of poor countries,” says lead author Wenju Cai, a climate modeler at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation in Aspendale, Australia, who published the study with his colleagues online today in Nature. “We really need to build our capacity to deal with these kinds of events.” In January, Cai led a study that found that extreme El Niño events—a warming of tropical waters off the coast of Peru—were likely to double in frequency this century.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Shang-Ping Xie, a climate modeler at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California, says he likes that the study team focused on providing information on a more local rather than global scale. “They took an important step in the direction of understanding regional climate extremes in a better way.”Cai and his colleagues examined 31 global climate models and found that 23 were able to model the rainfall conditions in the Indian Ocean that they used to define an extreme positive dipole event. As a control, they ran the models from 1900 to 1999 to see how well they reproduced extreme events in 1961, 1994, and 1997. Then they ran the models forward from 2000 to 2099 under the “business-as-usual” projections for rising greenhouse gases. Out of the 23 cases, only two did not show a rise in extreme dipole events. “We have a very strong intermodel agreement,” Cai says. Climate change, he says, causes the waters of the western Indian Ocean to warm more than other parts of the ocean, and this preconditions the area to more extreme dipole events.Lisa Goddard, director of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Columbia University in Palisades, New York, does not necessarily disagree with the researchers’ conclusions, but she is concerned that they model the Indian Ocean Dipole as being completely independent of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Studies have shown how an El Niño event can trigger a dipole event, and Goddard notes that two out of the three extreme dipole events, in 1994 and 1997, were preceded by El Niño. “They’re downplaying the role of ENSO,” she says.Cai insists that the dipole can arise independently of El Niño. He points out that in 2007 and 2008 there was a moderate dipole event even though La Niña was occurring, which ought to squelch the dipole event if it were so dependent on ENSO.Regardless, the dipole has the attention of people in Australia, where it has been linked to major bushfires in 1982 to 1983 (Ash Wednesday) and 2009 (Black Saturday) that killed hundreds. “The Indian Ocean Dipole is arguably more important to us,” he says. “It can cause big damages to these economies.”last_img read more

first_imgHow stress can clog your arteriesChronic stress is suspected to increase the risk of a heart attack, but we don’t know why. Now, a new study of harried medical residents and harassed rats finally offers an explanation for how stress damages the heart—and it revolves around our immune system.Neandertals ate their veggies, their feces revealSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Analysis of ancient human poop reveals the caveman diet wasn’t all about meat—Neandertals ate their vegetables, too. The discovery provides the first direct evidence that Neandertals in Europe cooked and ate plants about 50,000 years ago.Chemical weapons watchdog chief celebrates Syrian disarmamentTen months after news of a horrific chemical attack in Ghouta, near Damascus, shocked the world, the last 8% of Syria’s known chemical arsenal left the country on Monday. The shipment was a high point in an international mission launched in October 2013 to destroy the country’s stockpile, and a victory for the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.Is prison contagious?Social scientists have long observed that imprisonment behaves like a contagious disease. Now, a new simulation suggests the longer prison sentences that African-Americans often receive accelerate the rate of “infection”—and might be just enough to tip a problem into an epidemic.last_img read more

first_imgThe 2014 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel goes to Jean Tirole, a French economist, for his work studying industries dominated by a few large, powerful firms.“The prize is about market power and regulation,” said Tore Ellingsen, chair of the prize committee, in a video interview after the announcement in Stockholm today. “What sort of regulations and competition policy do you want in place so that large and mighty firms will act in society’s best interest?”Until the 1980s, regulation researchers sought simple rules that could apply to every industry and dealt essentially with two extreme situations: single monopolies or perfect competition. On the contrary, Tirole’s research focuses on oligopolies—markets that are dominated by a few companies—and embraces their complexity and peculiarities, says Reinhilde Veugelers, an economics professor at the University of Leuven in Belgium and senior fellow at the Bruegel think tank in Brussels. He also provided tools to deal with so-called asymmetric information, when public authorities have less information than the firms they are trying to regulate.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Although his work is theoretical, Tirole doesn’t shy away from providing practical policy recommendations, and his work still resonates with current debates about competition policies and the regulation of telecoms, banking, or energy markets, Veugelers tells ScienceInsider. “Some of Jean Tirole’s proposals, in particular in the field of banking regulation, might help reduce the probability that such crises occur again in the financial sector,” Ellingsen said, adding however that today’s award is “not really a political prize.” Observers agree that Tirole himself is hard to place on the political spectrum. “Like an engineer, he offers a toolkit for problem-solving that is applicable no matter your political preference,” Ellingsen said. According to Tyler Cowen, an economics professor at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, the prize rewards “theory” and “rigor.” Tirole follows the tradition of French 19th century theorists: “economics coming from a perspective with lots of math and maybe even some engineering,” Cowen wrote on his blog Marginal Revolution today. Tirole has two engineering degrees from some of France’s top schools, as well as two doctoral degrees from the Université Paris IX-Dauphine and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he worked from 1984 to 1992. He is currently scientific director at the Industrial Economic Institute at the Toulouse School of Economics in France and still works as a visiting professor at MIT.Tirole has displayed broad interests, publishing books, essays, and op-eds on subjects ranging from France’s health insurance policies to Europe’s currency crisis. Some of Tirole’s research also focused on patent policies, research, and innovation. For example, one of his theories—drawn with Josh Lerner—seeks to explain why programmers develop open source software even though it doesn’t earn them any money: Contributing to open source software “signals” ability and expertise, which can in turn increase their professional prospects.Today, the prize committee also mentioned the contribution of Tirole’s colleague Jean-Jacques Laffont, who died in 2004. In an online statement, Tirole praised Laffont as “a mentor”: “I am more than aware of the key role he played in what is happening to me today,” the laureate said.last_img read more

first_imgMultiple copies of a four-armed peptide wrap around lipids to create particles that mimic the behavior of HDL, the “good” cholesterol. A new drug candidate designed to mimic the body’s “good” cholesterol shows a striking ability in mice to lower cholesterol levels in the blood and dissolve artery-clogging plaques. What’s more, the compound works when given orally, rather than as an injection. If the results hold true in humans—a big if, given past failures at transferring promising treatments from mice—it could provide a new way to combat atherosclerosis, the biggest killer in developed countries.Although doctors already have effective cholesterol-lowering agents, such as statins, at their disposal, there’s room for improvement. Statins have significant side effects in some people and don’t always reduce cholesterol enough in others. “There is still plenty of heart disease out there even among people who take statins,” says Godfrey Getz, an experimental pathologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois.For that reason, researchers around the globe are searching for novel drugs that affect cholesterol levels in one of two ways. The first has been to reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), commonly known as bad cholesterol, which has been associated with higher heart disease risk. This is the goal of statins, which block an enzyme involved in cholesterol production. The second strategy is to increase levels of good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), which seems to boost heart health in people who have a lot of it. But producing HDL-raising drugs that prevent heart disease has proven difficult. In the body, a large protein called apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) wraps around fatty lipid molecules to create HDL particles that sop up LDL and ferry it to the liver where it is eliminated. So for several decades researchers have been designing and testing small protein fragments called peptides to see if they could mimic the behavior of apoA-I. One such peptide, known as 4F, did not reduce serum cholesterol levels, but it did shrink arterial plaques in mice, rabbits, and monkeys. And in an early clinical trial by researchers at Bruin Pharma Inc. in Beverly Hills, California, that was designed only to measure its safety in people, 4F didn’t appear to show any beneficial effect.  Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)M. Reza Ghadiri, a chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California, and his colleagues took a slightly different tack, creating a peptide that mimics another part of the apoA-I protein than 4F does. Initial in vitro studies suggested the peptide formed HDL-like particles and sopped up LDL, an encouraging result that prompted them to push it further. Ghadiri and his Scripps colleagues have now tested their compound in mice that develop artery clogging plaques when fed a Western-style high-fat diet. One group of animals received the peptide intravenously. For another group, the researchers simply added the compound to the animals’ water, a strategy they considered unlikely to work, because the gut contains high amounts of proteases designed to chop proteins apart. To their surprise, in both groups, serum cholesterol levels dropped 40% from their previous levels within 2 weeks of starting to take the drug. And by 10 weeks, the number of artery-clogging lesions had been reduced by half, the team reports in the October issue of the Journal of Lipid Research. What remains puzzling, however, is that Ghadiri and his colleagues did not detect their peptides in the blood of their test animal. Ghadiri says this suggests that the new peptide may work by removing cholesterol precursors in the gut before they enter the bloodstream.“It’s a very interesting result,” Getz says. But he cautions that the work has been tested only in animals, and many therapies—including the closely related 4F peptide—fail to transfer to humans. That said, Getz notes that some of the initial promising results with this peptide and other apoA-I mimics offer hope that researchers may soon come up with novel drugs capable of dissolving artery-clogging plaques before they can wreak their havoc. Y.Zhao et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 135 (2013) last_img read more

first_imgThe Ebola vaccine furthest along in development has cleared a critical milestone and edged closer to entering large-scale efficacy trials in West African countries hard hit by the current epidemic.As reported online today in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), a U.S. study done in 20 healthy people at no risk of developing the disease found the vaccine caused no serious side effects and, as hoped, triggered immune responses against the Ebola virus. The vaccine, jointly developed by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), contains a gene for the Ebola surface protein stitched inside a harmless chimpanzee adenovirus. Researchers at NIAID in Bethesda, Maryland, began the trial on 2 September, and the super–fast-track development of the vaccine could move it into trials involving 15,000 people in Liberia and Sierra Leone at high risk of developing the disease as soon as mid-January, NIAID Director Anthony Fauci told ScienceInsider.Other small studies of the vaccine, which, combined, involve 260 people, are under way in Mali, the United Kingdom, and Switzerland and should produce data by the end of next month. Ripley Ballou, who heads Ebola vaccine development for GSK, told ScienceInsider that the company needs these data before it can finalize plans for efficacy studies. In particular, Ballou says the ongoing trials should clarify which dose of the vaccine will trigger the most robust immune responses without side effects.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The report in NEJM describes results from two different doses: The higher one triggered more impressive antibody and T cell responses, but it also caused “transient fever” in two recipients. Fever is an early symptom of Ebola itself, and a vaccine that raises body temperature could lead recipients to needlessly worry they were developing the disease. “Clearly we want to select a dose that is both immunogenic and has an acceptable reactogenicity profile, including a low rate of fever,” says Ballou, who is based in Rixensart, Belgium. The ongoing trials are also evaluating a dose in between the two used in the NIAID trial.Fauci says he has no hesitation moving forward with the higher dose used in the NIAID study. “Obviously, we’d like to see no fevers, but the fact that we had two fevers that lasted less than 24 hours doesn’t bother me,” Fauci says. “We see transient fevers with other vaccines.”Similar small-scale tests of a second Ebola vaccine began in October; results are also expected by December that will determine whether to move it into efficacy trials, and at which dose. That vaccine, licensed by the Canadian government to NewLink Genetics of Ames, Iowa, contains the gene for Ebola’s surface protein stitched into a weakened version of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a pathogen that causes disease in livestock. NewLink, a small startup that focuses mainly on cancer drugs and has no products on the market, has been somewhat in the shadows of GSK, a big pharma. But on 24 November, NewLink and pharmaceutical giant Merck of Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, announced that they had entered a licensing agreement to jointly research and develop the VSV Ebola vaccine.Results from those efficacy studies could be in by April 2015. If the vaccines protect people from Ebola and appear safe, a pressing question will surface: Will GSK and Merck have enough doses produced by then to vaccinate enough people—which could mean hundreds of thousands or even millions—to help bring this epidemic to an end?*The Ebola Files: Given the current Ebola outbreak, unprecedented in terms of number of people killed and rapid geographic spread, Science and Science Translational Medicine have made a collection of research and news articles on the viral disease freely available to researchers and the general public.last_img read more

first_imgThink of it as solar wind on steroids. Powerful gales from supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies can blast gas and other raw materials right out of the galaxy, robbing it of the raw materials needed to make new stars, a new study suggests. Previously, astronomers have used x-ray telescopes to observe strong winds very near the massive black holes at galactic centers (artist’s concept, inset) and infrared wavelengths to detect the vast outflows of cool gas (bluish haze in artist’s concept, main image) from such galaxies as a whole, but they’ve never done so in the same galaxy. So the link between the two phenomena was supported only by astrophysical models. Now, for the first time, a team has actually seen both occurrences in a mass of stars—a galaxy dubbed IRAS F11119+3257, which formed from the collision of two smaller galaxies. Its central black hole is as massive as 16 million suns, and the region of space surrounding it shines with the strength of 1 trillion suns—energy derived, in part, from intense frictional heating within the disk of gas being sucked into the maw. Long-term observations of IRAS F11119+3257 suggest that winds near its central black hole blow outward at about 25% the speed of light, the researchers report today in Nature. Close to the galaxy’s center, the winds blast away only one solar mass worth of gas each year, the researchers say. But farther out from the center, the winds push away and remove about 800 solar masses of gas each year. Although in the short term strong stellar winds through gas clouds can instigate star formation, in this case the gas blown out of the galaxy’s inner regions will eventually strip the galaxy of the ingredients for future star growth. The new findings should help astronomers refine their models of how galaxies evolve, the researchers say.last_img read more