first_imgSome of the best young actors in the county will take to the stage of the Balor Theatre, Ballybofey, over two nights next week for the annual Donegal Secondary Schools Drama Festival.Organised by Teresa McGowan and the award-winning Butt Drama Circle, the prestigious competition has been running for more than forty years.During that time, it has been giving the youth of the county the opportunity to perform in front of a live audience in a professional theatre. Although it’s a schools festival, members of the public are welcome to come along for what promises to be two great nights of theatre on Tuesday, February 6th and Wednesday 7th.The festival will be adjudicated by Maura Logue who will award certificates of merit to the participants, including plaques for ‘Outstanding Performances.’The adjudicator said she feels very fortunate to have again been invited to this year’s schools festival. Every year, she also delivers some wise words of wisdom for the young actors and to those in the audience.In honour of the late Ben Duffy, founding member of the drama circle and who arranged the purchase of trophies for each year’s festivals, the club has commissioned the Ben Duffy Perpetual Cup in his memory. The local St Columba’s College, Stranorlar will be the first on stage on Tuesday night with an extract from the classic ‘Big Maggie.’ Always to the fore in schools drama, Coláiste Cholmcille, Ballyshannon, will stage two productions – Alias Cinderella and another to be confirmed.Loreto College, Milford, will close proceedings on the first night with ‘Thank you for the Music.’Opening on Wednesday will be Errigal College, Letterkenny, with their production of ‘Ernie’s Incredible Illucinations’, followed by the Royal and Prior, Raphoe, with an adaption of ‘Blood Brothers’. Making their debut, and closing the festival, The Yard Youth Centre will perform ‘Unmask Ulinity’.House opens at 7:30 pm and the curtain will rise at 8 pm sharp each night. Entry is just €5, or a concession rate of €3, and patrons can pay at the door.Stage is set at the Balor for Schools Drama Festival was last modified: January 29th, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BALOR THEATREButt Drama Circleschoolslast_img read more

first_imgA double whammy of weird ocean behavior washed over the world in 1997. The Pacific Ocean had already succumbed to an exceptionally strong El Niño, and then the Indian Ocean was hit fiercely by El Niño’s close cousin: the so-called Indian Ocean Dipole. Surface waters off the coast of Indonesia cooled and the ocean’s predominant westerly winds reversed, leading to catastrophic weather. Fires raged across a drought-stricken Indonesia, and floods across east African nations killed thousands.Climate change could make years like 1997 come more often, according to a new study of the Indian Ocean Dipole cycle, which alternates between two opposite extremes, positive and negative, just as El Niño does with La Niña. The study suggests that rising greenhouse gases will cause extreme positive dipole events—like the one that struck the Indian Ocean in 1997—to occur three times as often this century as they did in the 20th century, or about once every 6 years, as opposed to once every 17 years.“The Indian Ocean Dipole affects a lot of poor countries,” says lead author Wenju Cai, a climate modeler at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation in Aspendale, Australia, who published the study with his colleagues online today in Nature. “We really need to build our capacity to deal with these kinds of events.” In January, Cai led a study that found that extreme El Niño events—a warming of tropical waters off the coast of Peru—were likely to double in frequency this century.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Shang-Ping Xie, a climate modeler at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, California, says he likes that the study team focused on providing information on a more local rather than global scale. “They took an important step in the direction of understanding regional climate extremes in a better way.”Cai and his colleagues examined 31 global climate models and found that 23 were able to model the rainfall conditions in the Indian Ocean that they used to define an extreme positive dipole event. As a control, they ran the models from 1900 to 1999 to see how well they reproduced extreme events in 1961, 1994, and 1997. Then they ran the models forward from 2000 to 2099 under the “business-as-usual” projections for rising greenhouse gases. Out of the 23 cases, only two did not show a rise in extreme dipole events. “We have a very strong intermodel agreement,” Cai says. Climate change, he says, causes the waters of the western Indian Ocean to warm more than other parts of the ocean, and this preconditions the area to more extreme dipole events.Lisa Goddard, director of the International Research Institute for Climate and Society at Columbia University in Palisades, New York, does not necessarily disagree with the researchers’ conclusions, but she is concerned that they model the Indian Ocean Dipole as being completely independent of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Studies have shown how an El Niño event can trigger a dipole event, and Goddard notes that two out of the three extreme dipole events, in 1994 and 1997, were preceded by El Niño. “They’re downplaying the role of ENSO,” she says.Cai insists that the dipole can arise independently of El Niño. He points out that in 2007 and 2008 there was a moderate dipole event even though La Niña was occurring, which ought to squelch the dipole event if it were so dependent on ENSO.Regardless, the dipole has the attention of people in Australia, where it has been linked to major bushfires in 1982 to 1983 (Ash Wednesday) and 2009 (Black Saturday) that killed hundreds. “The Indian Ocean Dipole is arguably more important to us,” he says. “It can cause big damages to these economies.”last_img read more