first_img0Shares0000Alex Morgan’s first-half header proved to be the winner for the USA as they beat England 2-1 to reach the women’s World Cup final © AFP / FRANCK FIFELYON, France, Jul 3 – Alex Morgan scored what proved to be the winner but hailed goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher after her late penalty save from Steph Houghton allowed holders the United States to claim a dramatic 2-1 victory over England in their women’s World Cup semi-final on Tuesday.On her 30th birthday, USA co-captain Morgan headed home just after the half-hour mark in this last-four showdown to put her team back in front after Ellen White had cancelled out Christen Press’s early opener. But after an open first 45 minutes, the second half was dominated by more VAR controversy, with England having another White goal disallowed for the tightest of offside calls following a review by the Brazilian referee.Phil Neville’s team later benefited from Edina Alves Batista’s decision to award them a spot-kick when Becky Sauerbrunn made the slightest of contact with White in the box, yet Houghton’s kick was stopped by Naeher diving low to her right.England finished with 10 players after Millie Bright was sent off for a second yellow card late on, and the USA held out, despite playing the whole match without Megan Rapinoe.Scorer of all four US goals in the previous two rounds, the 33-year-old played no part due to a hamstring injury.“Alyssa Naeher, she should be the player of the match today. She saved our butts today,” said Morgan.“I’m so proud of every player who stepped up tonight. Our bench is so deep, and we showed that tonight. How can you beat this?”They will now go on to face Sweden or the Netherlands in Sunday’s final, as they aim to win the trophy for the fourth time in eight editions.In contrast, it is another bitterly disappointing way for England to lose, as they go out of a third consecutive major tournament in the semi-finals. Their players cut dejected figures on the pitch at full-time.Captain Steph Houghton’s late penalty miss cost England dear © AFP / FRANCK FIFE“Football can be cruel. We have had a fantastic ride. When we got the penalty I turned to my bench and said ‘we were going to win it,’ but it wasn’t to be,” Neville told the BBC.Four years ago it was an injury-time own goal that cost them against Japan, and this time they are left wondering what might have been had Houghton converted her spot-kick.– Rapinoe absence not felt –Perhaps Nikita Parris should have been given the chance to make up for her penalty misses against Argentina and Norway earlier in the competition? Jill Ellis’s side will not be too worried about that, as fortune favoured them.That England could not take advantage of Rapinoe’s absence said much about the strength in depth available to the USA, with the excellent Press taking her place.Unperturbed by the change, the Americans came flying out of the blocks like they have in every match at this tournament.They had scored no later than the 12th minute in all of their previous five matches, and here they required only 10 minutes to take the lead, Tobin Heath finding Kelley O’Hara whose cross was headed in by Press at the far post.Replacing the injured Karen Bardsley in goal, Carly Telford could do nothing to stop it, and England were stunned.However, they were back level on 19 minutes as Beth Mead’s pinpoint delivery picked out White and she steered the ball in off the frame of the goal for her sixth of the tournament.Yet it was the holders who went back in front just after the half-hour, Morgan stealing in front of Demi Stokes and heading home Lindsey Horan’s delivery. She celebrated by miming sipping on a cup of tea.As the USA tried to soak up pressure in the second half, England thought they were level on the 68th minute when Jill Scott’s flick picked out White to score, but VAR denied them the equaliser and her a seventh goal of the World Cup.Yet even when VAR came to their rescue, England failed to capitalise, and Bright’s late sending-off for a second yellow card as she scythed down Morgan summed up their frustration.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

first_imgHow stress can clog your arteriesChronic stress is suspected to increase the risk of a heart attack, but we don’t know why. Now, a new study of harried medical residents and harassed rats finally offers an explanation for how stress damages the heart—and it revolves around our immune system.Neandertals ate their veggies, their feces revealSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Analysis of ancient human poop reveals the caveman diet wasn’t all about meat—Neandertals ate their vegetables, too. The discovery provides the first direct evidence that Neandertals in Europe cooked and ate plants about 50,000 years ago.Chemical weapons watchdog chief celebrates Syrian disarmamentTen months after news of a horrific chemical attack in Ghouta, near Damascus, shocked the world, the last 8% of Syria’s known chemical arsenal left the country on Monday. The shipment was a high point in an international mission launched in October 2013 to destroy the country’s stockpile, and a victory for the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.Is prison contagious?Social scientists have long observed that imprisonment behaves like a contagious disease. Now, a new simulation suggests the longer prison sentences that African-Americans often receive accelerate the rate of “infection”—and might be just enough to tip a problem into an epidemic.last_img read more