first_img Tags: abdallah mubiruBul FCpolice fcStarTimes Uganda Premier League Police finished 7th last season (file photo)StarTimes Uganda Premier leaguePolice FC vs Bul FCStarTimes Stadium, LugogoSaturday, 29-09-2018Referee: Olemu GeorgePolice FC will be hoping they can get off to a winning start to their 2018/19 StarTimes Uganda Premier season when they host BUL FC at the StarTimes Stadium in Lugogo.The Cops who eventually finished seventh had a frustrating last season in which they spent the better part trying to fend off relegation but after a few changes, Abdallah Mubiru will be hoping he can stir them to past glory.“It is not going to be an easy season but we will take anything better than last, said Mubiru.“We have the first task in form of Bul who are a decent side but am confident we will take care of business.Mubiru is likely to unleash Shafik Bamuturaki and Hassan Kalega both on loan from Vipers SC, whereas new recruits Oromchan Villa, Musa Malunda, Joshua Lubwama and Jamaldine Buchochera are expected to make their debuts for the visitors.For Bul who finished sixth last season will have Peter Onen as head coach after the U17 national team tactician replaced Kefa Kisala at the helm.It would be a huge task asking him to gun for the top two places but surely has enough in his ranks to go at least one better than last season, starting with a result at Police.Pius Kaggwa, Norman Ogik and Simon Mbaziira are expected to lift up the hosts to a perfect start to the new fresh season. Custodian Hannington Sebwalunyo will have to be at his very best alongside forward Hamis Tibita to inspire the visitors to the promised land.Match Facts:This is the 15th league meeting between the two sides. Police have won a disappointing four times while Bul have triumphed on five occasions during that period.Last season, Bul defeated Police home and away including a 1-0 victory over the Cops in the reverse fixture.Police have won only two of their seven games at home to Bul (D2 3). They have gone three on the trot minus defeating the Jinja-based side in their own backyard with the last victory coming in May 2015.Friday’s results in the StarTimes Uganda Premier League:-KCCA FC 2-1 Tooro United-Vipers SC 1-0 Ndejje University-Kirinya JSS 2-2 SC Villa-URA 2-0 Paidah Black Angles-Bright Stars 3-1 Maroons-Onduparaka 2-0 Nyamityobora-Mbarara City *-* Express (PP)Comments last_img read more

first_imgMultiple copies of a four-armed peptide wrap around lipids to create particles that mimic the behavior of HDL, the “good” cholesterol. A new drug candidate designed to mimic the body’s “good” cholesterol shows a striking ability in mice to lower cholesterol levels in the blood and dissolve artery-clogging plaques. What’s more, the compound works when given orally, rather than as an injection. If the results hold true in humans—a big if, given past failures at transferring promising treatments from mice—it could provide a new way to combat atherosclerosis, the biggest killer in developed countries.Although doctors already have effective cholesterol-lowering agents, such as statins, at their disposal, there’s room for improvement. Statins have significant side effects in some people and don’t always reduce cholesterol enough in others. “There is still plenty of heart disease out there even among people who take statins,” says Godfrey Getz, an experimental pathologist at the University of Chicago in Illinois.For that reason, researchers around the globe are searching for novel drugs that affect cholesterol levels in one of two ways. The first has been to reduce levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), commonly known as bad cholesterol, which has been associated with higher heart disease risk. This is the goal of statins, which block an enzyme involved in cholesterol production. The second strategy is to increase levels of good cholesterol, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL), which seems to boost heart health in people who have a lot of it. But producing HDL-raising drugs that prevent heart disease has proven difficult. In the body, a large protein called apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) wraps around fatty lipid molecules to create HDL particles that sop up LDL and ferry it to the liver where it is eliminated. So for several decades researchers have been designing and testing small protein fragments called peptides to see if they could mimic the behavior of apoA-I. One such peptide, known as 4F, did not reduce serum cholesterol levels, but it did shrink arterial plaques in mice, rabbits, and monkeys. And in an early clinical trial by researchers at Bruin Pharma Inc. in Beverly Hills, California, that was designed only to measure its safety in people, 4F didn’t appear to show any beneficial effect.  Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)M. Reza Ghadiri, a chemist at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego, California, and his colleagues took a slightly different tack, creating a peptide that mimics another part of the apoA-I protein than 4F does. Initial in vitro studies suggested the peptide formed HDL-like particles and sopped up LDL, an encouraging result that prompted them to push it further. Ghadiri and his Scripps colleagues have now tested their compound in mice that develop artery clogging plaques when fed a Western-style high-fat diet. One group of animals received the peptide intravenously. For another group, the researchers simply added the compound to the animals’ water, a strategy they considered unlikely to work, because the gut contains high amounts of proteases designed to chop proteins apart. To their surprise, in both groups, serum cholesterol levels dropped 40% from their previous levels within 2 weeks of starting to take the drug. And by 10 weeks, the number of artery-clogging lesions had been reduced by half, the team reports in the October issue of the Journal of Lipid Research. What remains puzzling, however, is that Ghadiri and his colleagues did not detect their peptides in the blood of their test animal. Ghadiri says this suggests that the new peptide may work by removing cholesterol precursors in the gut before they enter the bloodstream.“It’s a very interesting result,” Getz says. But he cautions that the work has been tested only in animals, and many therapies—including the closely related 4F peptide—fail to transfer to humans. That said, Getz notes that some of the initial promising results with this peptide and other apoA-I mimics offer hope that researchers may soon come up with novel drugs capable of dissolving artery-clogging plaques before they can wreak their havoc. Y.Zhao et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 135 (2013) last_img read more